12.7 min readBy Published On: April 18th, 2023Categories: News6 Comments

BOSTON – Tuesday, April 18, 2023 – Mayor Michelle Wu and the City of Boston Community Preservation Committee (CPC) today announced the approval of 56 projects totaling over $40 million through the Community Preservation Act (CPA). Following the CPC’s public hearing and Mayor Wu’s recommendation, the proposed projects were approved by the Boston City Council at their weekly meeting on Wednesday, April 12. Projects supported with Community Preservation Act funding must create or preserve affordable housing, historic sites, or open space and recreation.

“The Community Preservation Act works to build a Boston for everyone by investing in both our City’s history and its future,” said Mayor Michelle Wu. “I am proud to partner with the Community Preservation Committee on these new projects which will help preserve historic assets while boosting access to affordable housing, open space, and recreation.”

“I wish to thank the Community Preservation Committee and team for their steadfast leadership and work with the community over the past five years to enhance our neighborhoods through historic preservation, parks and open spaces, and affordable housing projects,” said City Council President Ed Flynn. “I am particularly excited to see that over $20 million of CPA funds this year will go towards funding affordable housing across the city, including $4 million to create 110 units in Chinatown to support our immigrant neighbors and working families, and $2.5 million to create affordable housing for seniors at the McDevitt Senior Homes in South Boston. Both of these neighborhoods are seeing increasing displacement of lower and middle income residents and families as a result of high rents.”

“Some of the most exciting and creative projects in our ever-changing City–innovative affordable housing projects, parks, and historic preservation projects– are the result of resident and community driven CPA proposals,” said Councilor Michael Flaherty, Chair of the Council’s Community Preservation Committee. “I am so thankful for the vision and partnership of the many leaders that helped us get the ballot measure passed years ago and continue to be thankful for the partnership with Mayor Wu and the Community Preservation Committee. I am confident that the over $40 million allocation in CPA funds will allow for significant community-driven, transformational change in every corner of our neighborhoods and look forward to another exciting round of applications.”

Including this funding round, the City of Boston has awarded over $157M to support 293 projects including 112 open space and recreation projects, 46 affordable housing projects, and 135 historic preservation projects since 2018. Mayor Wu previously announced some of these affordable housing projects as part of her investment of $67 million in new recommended funding to create and preserve more than 800 income-restricted units of housing in eight Boston neighborhoods.

The Community Preservation Fund was created following voters’ passage and adoption of the Community Preservation Act in November 2016. It is funded by a 1 percent property tax-based surcharge on residential and business property tax bills, which took effect in July 2017, and an annual state funding from the Massachusetts Community Preservation Trust Fund. The Mayor and Community Preservation Committee recommend funding use and the City Council must vote to approve.

“Under the leadership of Councilor Flaherty, the Boston CPC is thrilled the City Council approved these projects,” said Felicia Jacques, Chair of the Community Preservation Committee. “We recommended projects which respond to Mayor Wu’s commitment to advance innovative responses to historic resources, create varied housing solutions, and fund sustainable, climate conscious open spaces. In granting $40M in community resources, the largest funding since the CPA was implemented in Boston, the committee is proud to have supported these projects across the City.”

After the Committee’s review of applications received for Community Preservation Act funding, the following projects were approved by the Council. The proposals include 10 affordable housing, 27 historic preservation and 19 open space and recreation projects across 15 neighborhoods.

Affordable Housing: 10 projects, totaling $20,491,834

Chinatown – Parcel R-1

$3,000,000 To partially fund the creation of 44 units of affordable homeownership housing. Homeownership units consist of (16) 1-bedroom units, (24) 2-bedroom units, and four 3-bedroom units. Half will be affordable at or below 80% AMI and half at or below 100% AMI.

Chinatown – Parcel R-1

$1,266,513 To partially fund the creation of 66 units of affordable rental housing. The rental units are (24) 1-BR units, (36) 2-BR units, and (6) 3-BR units. Rental units will range from 30% AMI to 80% AMI.

Jamaica Plain – 361 Centre Street

$3,000,000 To partially fund an​ ​adaptive reuse rental proj​ect utilizing the vacant (for 18 years) Blessed Sacrament Church at 361 Centre Street in the Hyde Square neighborhood. To ​transform this former religious building into 55 units of housing. Fifty affordable units ranging from 30-60% AMI​. ​

Mattapan – Blue Hill Ave – B1 Parcels

$1,500,000 To partially fund the transformation of five vacant and underutilized City-owned parcels located along a stretch of Blue Hill Avenue that bisects the Dorchester and Mattapan neighborhoods. The proposed ownership unit mix of 80% and 100% AMI will include, (4) 1-bedroom units, eleven (11) 2-bedroom units, and three (3) 3-bedroom units. In addition, the project will provide seven (7) parking spaces, and approximately 1,792 square feet of ground floor retail space for sale at an affordable rate.

Mattapan – Blue Hill Ave – B1 Parcels

$1,306,591 To partially fund the transformation of five (5) vacant and underutilized City-owned parcels located along a stretch of Blue Hill Avenue that bisects the Dorchester and Mattapan neighborhoods. The proposed rental unit mix of 50%, 60%, 80% and 90% AMI will include five (5) 1-bedroom units, (5) 2-bedroom units, and (2) 3-bedroom units. In addition, the project includes approximately 1,591 square feet of ground floor retail space for lease at an affordable rate.

Mattapan – Brooke House at Olmsted Village

$2,500,000 To partially fund the new construction mixed-use building that will be approximately 152,700 sq ft. The six-story building will include 125 affordable senior rental apartments for households earning up to 60% of the AMI. The new apartments will be designated for households aged 62 and over. 13 units will be set aside for homeless or formerly homeless households. Additionally, this project will include a child care center, a health care center, and a publicly accessible community space.

Roxbury – Copeland Corner

$1,918,730 To partially fund the new production of 12 affordable homeownership units in Roxbury. The project would create six homeownership units available at or below 80 percent AMI and six homeownership units available at or below 100 percent AMI.

Roxbury – 84 Warren Street

$1,500,000 To partially fund the creation of​ ownership ​units ​at the intersection of Warren Street and Warren Place in Nubian Square.​​ The completed project will total approximately 106,212 gross sq ft with 15 income-restricted homeownership condominium units, (11) units at 80% AMI, and (4) units at 100% AMI.

Roxbury – 2085 Washington Street

$2,000,000 To partially fund the final phase of the redevelopment of Parcel ​(​10)​, a 10-story tower on BPDA land​. The development will include the new construction of 32 homeownership units. Homeownership units consist of eight 1-bedroom units and 24 2-bedroom units, with 15 units affordable at or below 80% AMI and 15 units affordable at or below 100% AMI.

South Boston – McDevitt Senior Homes

$2,500,000 To partially fund the ​repurposing of the 5-story​ ​McDevitt Hall building into 36 units of affordable senior rental housing. The project will include 35 units of affordable housing for people aged 62 and over, ​19​ of the units will be affordable to households at or below 50% AMI, and ​16​ units will be affordable to households at or below 30% AMI, including four homeless set-aside units.​ ​Originally a convent of the St. Augustine’s Parish in South Boston, built in 1926, unique features​ will be preserved; front yard, entranceway, and 5th-floor solarium.​​

Historic Preservation: 27 Projects totaling $10,182,600

Allston-Brighton – American Buddhist Association Building

$500,000 To rehabilitate the circa 1894 belltower by funding emergency repairs to the masonry and roofing.

Back Bay – First Baptist Church

$575,000 To rehabilitate the historical First Baptist Church building and tower by funding emergency masonry repairs.

Back Bay – Gibson House Museum

$69,500 ​​To preserve the ​exterior of the ​Gibson House Museum​ ​building to prevent further injury and harm.

Beacon Hill – Beacon Hill Friends House

$500,000 To ​preserve and restore the 1805 Federal-style double townhouse by funding repairs to the rear ell.

Charlestown – Charlestown Boys and Girls Club

$50,000 To preserve the masonry exterior of the historic 60 High Street building.

Chinatown – St. James the Greater Church

$400,000 To restore the 1864 exterior structure of the St. James Church; repairs include a new drainage system and exterior masonry repairs.

Dorchester – Greenwood Memorial Church

$600,000 Exterior restoration to replace deteriorated historic features, wood shingle siding, and repair of architectural woodwork.

Dorchester – First Parish Church Dorchester Meetinghouse

$115,000 To preserve and restore the 1897 First Parish Dorchester Meetinghouse repairs include the restoration of windows and the historic clock tower.

Dorchester – First Haitian Baptist Church

$416,000 To preserve the historic First Haitian Baptist Church by funding masonry repairs and the creation of a conditions assessment.

Dorchester – Global Ministries Christian Church

300,000 To rehabilitate the historical 1889, shingle style, church building by funding the final phase of exterior carpentry work.

Dorchester – Humphreys Street Studios

$611,518 Preservation of the historic Humphrey Street Studio building, exterior repairs include roof replacement, masonry repairs, and replacing rusting fire escape.

Dorchester – Pleasant Hill Baptist Church

$80,000 To rehabilitate and restore the 1941 Pleasant Hill Baptist Church by funding the repair of the building’s failed front steps.

Dorchester – Unity Sports And Cultural Club

$211,800 To rehabilitate and restore the Unity Sports and Cultural Center building by funding masonry repairs and the addition of a new roof and drainage system as well as the creation of a conditions assessment.

Dorchester – Pierce House

$50,125 Rehabilitation of 1683 Pierce House, alterations to existing rear entry to make it ADA compliant, including a landscape-based ramping solution.

Downtown – Tremont Temple Baptist Church

$750,000 To restore the 1896 Tremont Temple Baptist Church by funding comprehensive masonry and building envelope repairs.

Hyde Park – Riverside Theater Building

$550,000 Restoration and repair of rear exit way, rear structural wall, and masonry repairs to Riverside Theater/French’s Opera House historic building in Hyde Park.

Jamaica Plain – First Church in Jamaica Plain

$500,000 To preserve the First Church in Jamaica Plain by funding the installation of a new slate roof.

Jamaica Plain – Boston Firefighter Memorial Monument

$27,000 To restore the historic Boston Firefighters Memorial Monument at the Forest Hill Cemetery. Repairs to the granite base, bronze statue, and plaque. The monument is surrounded by the graves of deceased Boston firefighters dating back to the early 1800s.

Jamaica Plain – First Baptist Church in Jamaica Plain

$148,825 To restore the historic First Baptist Church in Jamaica Plain by funding the last phase of exterior stucco repair to the building.

Jamaica Plain – Bethel AME Church

$500,000 Rehabilitation of the historic Bethel AME Church, capital improvements include repairs and repointing at the sanctuary north elevation. Preservation and rehabilitation of ADA-accessible rampway and new permeable pavers at the forecourt.

Jamaica Plain – Community Care Collaborative Building

$160,882 To preserve the historic building at 36 Perkins Street by funding masonry repairs and the creation of a building conditions assessment.

Roxbury – Shirley-Eustis House Stable

$650,000 To preserve the historic stable building associated with the Shirley-Eustis estate by contributing funding toward its acquisition. The building will be used as a means of teaching and investigating the property’s connections to slavery and colonialism in Boston.

Roxbury – Abbotsford Museum

$675,000 To rehabilitate and restore the historic Abbotsford estate by funding the final phase of masonry repair to the building.

Roxbury – Twelfth Baptist Church

$679,150 To rehabilitate the historic 1873 Twelfth Baptist Church by funding the removal of the failed permastone and stucco exterior and restoring its original wood cladding.

South Boston – Congress Street Fire Station

$395,500 Exterior restorations to the historic 1891 Fire Station, work will include repair and repointing of masonry at the side and rear elevations.

South End – Union Church

$500,000 To preserve the 150-year-old building of the historically black Union Church; a comprehensive plan to reroof the church and Installation of a new drainage system.

West Roxbury – Theodore Parker Church

$167,300 To preserve the historic Theodore Parker Church by funding the repair and repointing of masonry at the east elevation of the building.

Open Space & Recreation: 19 Projects totaling $10,002,021

Beacon Hill- Peter Faneuil House

$280,000 To rehabilitate the basketball court and perform critical masonry repairs in the community space located at the Peter Faneuil House.

Boston Harbor – Georges Island Pavilion

$49,900 Additional funding to construct a new outdoor permanent pavilion on Georges Island.

Charlestown – Little Mystic Channel Plaza

$250,000 To redesign and rehabilitate the Charles-Newtown Plaza in the lower Little Mystic Channel of Charlestown, including plantings, shade structures, a lawn area, and seating.

Charlestown – Wolcott Cutler Memorial Garden

$150,000 To create an ADA-accessible pathway and patio in an existing publicly-accessible church garden.

Charlestown – John J. Ryan Park

$1,000,000 To rehabilitate the John J. Ryan Park in Charlestown by constructing a 6-foot seawall and vegetated berm along the banks of the Mystic River to protect the site and surrounding neighborhoods from storm surges and sea-level rise, with a pathway atop the berm.

Charlestown – Gardens for Charlestown

$60,000 To rehabilitate the border and retaining walls of the Charlestown community garden by replacing the existing timbers with manufactured stone.

Citywide – Boston Open Space Acquisition

$1,200,000 The Boston Open Space Acquisition Fund shall be used for acquisitions that permanently protect land for the purposes of recreation or natural resource protection and conservation, including but not limited to conservation restrictions and fee simple ownership by the Boston Parks and Recreation Department or the Boston Conservation Commission.

Dorchester – Franklin Field Elders Garden

$495,000 Phase II funding to create a community garden space at the Franklin Field BHA housing site, including the addition of a pollinator garden to support gardening.

Dorchester – Washington Street Urban Forest

$450,000 Additional funding to create an urban forest, including the addition of a community plaza and walking paths, on Washington Street.

Dorchester – Norwell Street Park

$660,000 Additional funding to create a centralized gathering recreational space and proposed climate-smart park at 217-229 Norwell Street in Dorchester.

Dorchester – Cedar Grove Cemetery

$85,000 To replace trees due to age and plant twenty or more new trees to restore the tree canopy in the historical Cedar Grove Cemetery.

Jamaica Plain – Mary E. Curley K-8 School Playground

$1,000,000 To rehabilitate the Curley School K-8 schoolyard, including a new playground with all-inclusive, accessible structures, sensory elements, and a court area.

Jamaica Plain – Jackson Square Redevelopment Greenway

$450,000 Additional funding to create a greenway which will link residential communities directly to Jackson Square T Station and the Southwest Corridor.

Mattapan – Steven P. Odom Serenity Garden

$406,123 To create a new serenity garden and recreational space adjacent to a new housing development to honor the late Steven P. Odom, a 13-year-old Dorchester resident who was an innocent victim of violence.

Roslindale – Bethany Church Public Park

$485,998 To create a new accessible public recreational space on church-owned land, including new seating areas, community garden space, and community event space.

Roxbury – William Monroe Trotter Elementary School Playground

$1,000,000 To rehabilitate the Trotter Elementary schoolyard by creating a vibrant and safe playground that accommodates children ages 4-12 and includes sensory play equipment for children of varying abilities.

Roxbury – Roxbury Community College Recreational Space

$450,000 To create a new park, including a splash pad, tot lot, and new plantings, that will serve the Roxbury Community College community as well as the surrounding neighborhood.

Roxbury – Nathan Hale School Playground

$1,000,000 To rehabilitate the Nathan Hale schoolyard, including a new play structure, outdoor meeting space, and basketball court, which will serve students as well as the surrounding community.

West Roxbury – Sophia Snow Place

$530,000 Additional funding to create a new healing garden, which will include an accessible entrance path, native trees and plants, and a wooden boardwalk extending over the certified vernal pool located in Allandale Woods.

 

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6 Comments

  1. Linda Lynch April 20, 2023 at 3:16 pm - Reply

    Hmmm, South Boston didn’t get much. 1 housing bldg for elders, with a mixed housing use.

    The fire station on Congress St, glad that is getting some work done, but was hoping for more for the actual South Boston area.

    Thanks Mike Flaherty.

    • Maureen Dahill April 20, 2023 at 4:23 pm - Reply

      Residents need to submit projects. That’s how it works.

    • Linda Masse April 20, 2023 at 10:28 pm - Reply

      How do you get on waiting list or apply for the South Boston senior housing?

  2. Robert Morris April 20, 2023 at 6:24 pm - Reply

    Agree with this comment

    What happen to historic fence restored at M St Park. Will it ever be done?

  3. Linda Lynch April 25, 2023 at 5:03 pm - Reply

    Maureen Dahill, I attend a lot of community meetings, and the residents are always asking for projects to be done. I’ll end it here.

    • Maureen Dahill April 26, 2023 at 3:05 pm - Reply

      yes, but you have to fill out the application etc. You have to take ownership of the project. That’s how the process works.

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